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Hepworth in Yorkshire: Lee Sheldrake’s photos of the Yorkshire Landscape

In 1964, Barbara Hepworth commissioned photographer Lee Sheldrake to take pictures of Yorkshire for her book Drawings from a Sculptor’s Landscape, in which she made a connection between her work and the landscape she grew up in. She wrote within that the photographs ‘taken of Yorkshire were chosen nostalgically’, remembering the journeys around the county she took with her father, the county surveyer, as a child. We’re showing a selection of these in the forthcoming exhibition, Hepworth in Yorkshire, and want to identify all the places within the images.

Get in touch at hello@hepworthwakefield.org.

Hepworth in Yorkshire Sheldrake 1

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REDISCOVERED, EARLIEST KNOWN PORTRAIT OF BARBARA HEPWORTH IS GIFTED TO WAKEFIELD

We are delighted to announce the recent acquisition of a rediscovered portrait of the young Barbara Hepworth. Generously gifted to the Wakefield Council Permanent Art Collection by a private American collector, the portrait will be the centrepiece work in a new exhibition Hepworth in Yorkshire, which opens at the gallery on Saturday 16 May.

This will be the first time in 90 years that the painting will be publicly shown. It is considered to be the earliest known portrait of Barbara Hepworth, dated from around 1920, when Hepworth would have been 17 years old.

Curator Eleanor Clayton looking at Ethel Walker 'Barbara Hepworth' c1920. Image: Tom Arber

Curator Eleanor Clayton looking at Ethel Walker ‘Barbara Hepworth’ c1920. Image: Tom Arber

The portrait was painted by Royal Academician Ethel Walker, who lived part-time in Robin Hood’s Bay on the North Yorkshire coast, where Hepworth and her family spent their summers and was most likely the location where they would have met.

Brought at auction for £1,000 as a ‘portrait of a lady’ it is only recently that the sitter has been identified as Barbara Hepworth, one of Britain’s most significant artists.

Simon Wallis, Director said: “We are thrilled to have this important work in our collection, thought to be the earliest portrait of Hepworth. We are sincerely grateful for the generosity of the collector in gifting this work to the people of Wakefield, for the wider public to enjoy in many years to come – I think it’s wonderful to see Hepworth come home.”

Ethel Walker 'Barbara Hepworth' c1920 before it goes on display. Image: Tom Arber.

Ethel Walker ‘Barbara Hepworth’ c1920 before it goes on display. Image: Tom Arber

The Hepworth in Yorkshire exhibition offers an unprecedented insight into the earliest years of the life and work of Yorkshire-born artist Barbara Hepworth. Hepworth herself asserted that the experience of growing up in Yorkshire was hugely influential on her work. The exhibition will also exhibit for the first time family photographs and images of Hepworth’s formative years, as well as some of her earliest drawings, paintings and sculpture that show Hepworth’s natural gifts in these mediums.

Archive images and works by Barbara Hepworth to feature in the Hepworth in Yorkshire exhibition opening 16 May. Image: Tom Arber

Archive images and works by Barbara Hepworth to feature in the Hepworth in Yorkshire exhibition opening 16 May. Image: Tom Arber

Head of a Lady c. 1920, a sketch by Hepworth during her school years will also feature in the exhibition. One of just a few works remaining from Hepworth’s teenage years, this will be the first time that this sketch has been publicly displayed. These beautifully executed drawings from Hepworth’s juvenilia are unlike the work Hepworth is known for, taking inspiration from Victorian children’s illustrators like Arthur Rackham.

The Hepworth Wakefield Print Fair: The Lost Fox

Leading up to The Hepworth Wakefield Print Fair on Sat 21 & Sun 22 March we’ll be previewing stall holders on the THW blog.

The Lost Fox is designer/illustrator Dan Forster and printmaker Jan Hirst, who have combined their skills to produce limited edition screen prints.
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The Hepworth Wakefield Print Fair: B&B

Leading up to The Hepworth Wakefield Print Fair on Sat 21 & Sun 22 March we’ll be previewing stall holders on the THW blog.

B&B is an independent screen-print studio, gallery and residency programme founded by curators and artists Bradbury & Blanchard. Tucked away on a cobbled back street within Sheffield’s Cultural Industries Quarter, the gallery promotes the work of emerging and established contemporary artists through periodic exhibitions, fanzines and offshoot projects.
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The Hepworth Wakefield Print Fair: Alison Deegan

Leading up to The Hepworth Wakefield Print Fair on Sat 21 & Sun 22 March we’ll be previewing stall holders on the THW blog.

Self-taught printmaker Alison Deegan has been working with lino prints since 2008. She creates small editions (less than 45), some in monochrome and others with three or more colours using a combination of reduction and multi-block techniques.
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The Hepworth Wakefield Print Fair: Mister Charlesworth Design

Leading up to The Hepworth Wakefield Print Fair on Sat 21 & Sun 22 March we’ll be previewing stall holders on the THW blog.
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The Hepworth Wakefield Print Fair: Emma Mason Gallery

Leading up to The Hepworth Wakefield Print Fair on Sat 21 & Sun 22 March we’ll be profiling stall holders on the THW blog.
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Nawal Gebreel at The Hepworth Wakefield Shop

In celebration of the UK’s largest Lynda Benglis exhibition at The Hepworth Wakefield, we are pleased to introduce our new luxurious collection of elaborate handmade scarves by accessories designer Nawal Gebreel. Gebreel’s work is heavily influenced by tactile textures, the rhythms of nature and Japanese folding techniques which are highly evocative of the sculptures of Lynda Benglis.

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Lynda Benglis at The Hepworth Wakefield

From 6 February until 1 July 2015 The Hepworth Wakefield will present the UK’s first museum survey of work by Greek-American artist and feminist icon Lynda Benglis. This highly anticipated exhibition will be the largest presentation of Benglis’ work in the UK, featuring approximately 50 works that will span the entirety of her prolific career to date.
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Alexandra Bircken’s Anna Gen, 2014

Alexandra Bircken is best known for her unique sculptures in which a mixture of natural and synthetic materials undergo a transformation of processes to become knitted, knotted or strung together. Within the exhibition Conflict and Collisions: New Contemporary Sculpture currently showing at The Hepworth Wakefield until 25 January, Bircken uses her formal training in fashion and textiles to explore the use of materials in particular leather, wool, silicon and hair.

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